KAYTRAMINÉ Gives Another Preview Of Album With Rebuke

Credit: Lucas Creighton

Kaytranada and Aminé reveal their current “Rebuke” single as KAYTRAMINÉ days before the release of their self-titled album. “Rebuke ” is a warm island vibe with hip-hop running through it thanks to Aminé’s relationship-focused rap. The single is the second one from the album. Last month they released a pastel-colored video for “4EVA” featuring Pharrell. Their decades-long process to this new collection of songs will be fully heard when the album comes out on Friday. 




Media Questions Of The Week

Is Larenz Tate right about Hollywood placing a higher value on Black British actors? 

https://youtu.be/_iYU9h7FEw0

Are AI-generated songs of artists like Ghostwriter’s  Drake and Weeknd “Heart On My Sleeve” duet really a threat to the artists whose work gets used? 

 

 

Did Ed Sheeran plagiarize Marvin Gaye’s “Let’s Get It On” for his single “Thinking Out Loud?” 

Who painted over the Frankie Knuckles and Juice WRLD murals in Chicago? 




Media Questions Of The Week

Is it a “crime” that Cleopatra is being portrayed as a Black woman in the Jada Pinkett-produced Queen Cleopatra for Netflix? 

 

What happened to Frank Ocean’s show at Coachella?




Waajeed Releases Memoirs Of Hi-Tech Jazz Album

Waajeed’s Memoirs Of Hi-Tech Jazz is an ode to Black resistance and the automobile’s significance to life in his native Detroit. The producer set the tone for the album with his cinema-worthy video for “Motor City Madness.” The car ride around the city in the visual is described in the liner notes as a trip from “labor to pleasure” because the music reflects the people’s need to work and play. There are plenty of electronic keys and synthesizers meeting up with horns from soul-jazz traditions. The album is longer thanks to six 12-inch versions of songs like the party anthem “Snake Eyes.” But “Rouge” is a reminder of Detroit’s history of Black protest with its chants of “No justice no peace.” Waajeed’s jazz-imbued house fuses two of the city’s favored genres together in a salute to Black political agency and pleasure. 

Memoirs of Hi-Tech Jazz by Waajeed